Homes of the Future

Imagine how fun it will be to design your own custom home and have it 3-D printed! 

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Article courtesy of 
Clare Trapasso, Realtor.com

How 3-D Printers Will Lower Prices, Make Fantasies Real, and Transform the Housing Market

Printers have come a long way from simply churning out reams of spreadsheets, high school history reports, and cute cat photos. In case you haven’t heard, 3-D printing is rapidly changing, well, everything. The technology is making the unimaginable real, already producing everything from simple plastic toys to edible pizza and even human tissue and body parts (an ear!). Additive technology, as it’s also called, promises to revolutionize the world as we know it.

And the greatest potential for transformation and disruption, some believe, may be in housing. If “printed homes” seem like a distant fantasy, you’d better buckle your seat belts. You’re in for quite a ride.

So how exactly is 3-D printing poised to reshape the housing market?

Well, let’s start with price. Three-dimensional printers don’t require laborers, produce much less waste (as materials are fed into the machines), and will be able to erect homes in days instead of months—making them substantially cheaper to build. And that’s expected to extend the American dream to a whole new group of buyers who would otherwise never be able to afford their own abodes.

Gone will be the problems caused by a shortage of highly skilled construction workers, long building times, and wasted materials such as lumber.

And let’s touch on dreams. Three-dimensional printing will eventually help facilitate the creation of radical new housing designs, new shapes, and brand-new architectural ideas. The road from fanciful concept to livable reality will become shorter and more traversable than ever.

This is exciting stuff—and not just for those who are currently priced out of homeownership. Imagine your average accountant or Chipotle manager being able to design their own Frank Gehry–styled, uniquely shaped home on a computer— and a specialized, industrial-size 3-D printer bringing it into existence in a matter of hours or days for just a fraction of the usual price. Then think of what the technology could mean for storm-ravaged communities if residents who lost their homes could have identical replacements easily printed, complete with furniture.

And we’re not talking about a far-distant future. Rudimentary printed structures, mostly made of concrete and resembling stark gray boxes, are already sprouting up around the globe. Now a handful of cutting-edge construction companies are engaged in something like a 3-D printing arms race—each striving to be the first to refine the technology.

A Chinese company even recently printed a two-story, 4,305-square-foot building on-site in just 45 days.

And while such current buildings may not exactly be the “dream home” of your average buyer, experts predict that within five to 25 years (depending on whom you’re talking to), the technology will be advanced enough to print sophisticated and easily customizable dwellings out of wood, metal, and stone. These are places that buyers would be proud to call their own.

How to print a home

Here’s how it works: Building designs are created in a computer just like in a computer-aided design, or CAD, program and then transmitted to a large, specially made industrial printer, like the one above. The devices vary greatly in size and capabilities, depending on who is making them—but all of them are big. The apparatuses usually have one or more robotic arms tipped with a nozzle that spews out construction materials as the arms make their computer-programmed rotations around the base of the building. (Think of cake icing being squeezed through a piping bag.)

Those liquidlike materials, similar to molten lava, are layered on top of one another to form the walls of the structure. These materials can vary from fiber-reinforced concrete, which doesn’t require steel rebars for support, to steel and even wood, which would require reinforcements.

And eventually, experts predict the technology will print modern-day necessities such as electricity and plumbing at the same time as the home is being constructed.

“It’s still very early,” says Aric Rindfleisch, executive director of the Illinois MakerLab, a 3-D printing lab at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. “We’re probably back to where the computer industry was in 1982.”

The challenges to 3-D printing

So when is it coming, for real?

Opinions vary. Rindfleisch believes the technology is still about 25 years away from creating sophisticated homes that buyers would be vying to live in. Other experts have pegged the timeline closer to just a decade—or even half that.

The challenges lie mostly with the materials fed into the devices—and working around their current-day limitations. Scientists are closely tracking the materials used for construction and how long they take to dry before a new layer can be added, Rindfleisch says.

He says progress is coming at a rapid clip. “About two years ago, all we could print was hard plastic,” he says. “Now we can print soft plastics. We can print wood.” The wood is basically a pulp mixed with plastic that can be fed into the printer.

Home buyers could become home designers

The printing process is likely to eventually empower more everyday home buyers without fancy architecture degrees to design their own perfect pad on a computer—and then print it out on a plot of land.

“You can have high design on a budget,” says architect Christopher Hurst at WATG Urban Architecture Studio. “You don’t have to go to a builder and get the same cookie-cutter house next door. … Now you can go to a contractor, and you have a highly customizable house that’s indicative of you and that way you can express yourself in how you live.”

In April, Hurst’s Chicago-based firm won the Freeform House Design Challenge with its sleek Curve Appeal home. Construction on the winning design, which will, of course, be printed three-dimensionally, is slated to begin in November by Branch Technology, the Chattanooga, TN–based builder that sponsored the contest.

The home would go for about $900,000 on the market if it were conventionally built, Hurst says. But he hopes to print the carbon fiber structure at a Chattanooga site at a fraction of the cost.

“The limitations are [that] the arm [of the printer] can only reach so far,” he says of the 15-foot appendage. “If you print large structures, you’d need a much bigger machine. … Eventually, we’ll have multiple arms printing simultaneously.”

Once the technical challenges are solved, a 2,500-square-foot home could go up in less than 24 hours instead of months, predicts 3-D home building pioneer Behrokh Khoshnevis, an engineering professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He gave a TED Talk on the subject.

And the buildings could be more attractive to buyers than those constructed by human hands, he says.

“In stick frame [i.e., traditional] construction, it’s very hard to use curvature. It’s very hard to bend lumber. It’s very hard to bend drywall,” says Khoshnevis, whose 3-D printer company Contour Crafting has a contract with NASA. But “a computer can build any shape.”

A boon to cities?

The new technology could make its biggest mark, at least initially, in the nation’s urban areas.

Three-dimensional printing will enable developers to put up buildings on previously “unbuildable” sites—such as smaller city plots where it would be near impossible to fit a crane, says K.C. Conway, head of market intelligence for commercial real estate lending at SunTrust Bank in Atlanta. It could turn costly and time-consuming regulatory problems into no big deal as building plans will be redesigned by computers—instead of flesh-and-blood architects.

“It will bring affordability back to urban housing,” says Conway, also a member of Counselors of Real Estate, a Chicago-based group of industry professionals who provide real estate advice. “The later adoption will be in the suburbs.”

Another bonus is that homes will eventually be able to go up a lot quicker—that’s particularly important in natural disaster–ravaged areas, points out Alex Le Roux.  He began designing a 3-D printer while he was still a mechanical engineering major at Baylor University in Waco, TX. Now the 23-year-old is CEO of Vesta Printer, which printed a rudimentary, 120-square-foot building in June in Katy, TX. He’s hoping to soon print larger ones.

His company has received funding from ModEco Development, a Rochester, MI–based builder that has been experimenting with the technology.

“This is where we see the business going,” says ModEco owner Drake Boroja. “The American dream is getting harder and harder to get [as the prices of homes are soaring]. We see these tools as a way to keep this dream going for the next generation."

 

For the entire article with photos – CLICK HERE

 


Posted on September 1, 2016 at 7:44 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Current Portland Real Estate Market Information |

Blue Star Donuts to Open at PDX Airport

 

The Portland Airport is about to get a little sweeter with one of my favorite foods….donuts!

 

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Article courtesy of Kelly Clarke, Portland Monthly

Tourists bustling through the Portland International Airport will have to make room for boxes of hard cider fritters and Cointreau crème brulee rounds atop their carry-on bags:  local doughnut empire Blue Star Donuts just inked a deal to open a PDX location by November of this year.  The outpost, which joins a superstar list of local businesses with airport spots, from Country Cat to Stumptown Coffee, will be located in the Oregon Market area, before travelers reach the security gate.

“I’m absolutely thrilled,” says Blue Star CEO/owner Katie Poppe, who launched the chain with biz partner Micah Camden. “The Port is working really hard to create this mini Portland utopia and we’re honored to be part of that.” The new airport shop will stock grab-and-go half- and baker’s dozen boxes of its brioche-style doughnuts, fresh-glazed single rounds, and Coava Coffee Roaster’s “Blue Star Blend” drip and packaged coffee.

The expansionist-minded local chain currently boasts four Portland outposts, an L.A. shop, and a pair of locations on Tokyo. (Psst: Blue Star is slated to open five more locations in Japan come September—three in Osaka and two more in Tokyo.)

What Blue Star creation must visitors cart back to their hometowns?

“It’s gotta be the blueberry bourbon basil doughnut,” says Poppe, referencing the buzzed-about flavor that made cover of Bon Appétit magazine in May. “If it’s gonna be your first, it might as well be a cover model.” 

 


Posted on August 3, 2016 at 11:21 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in cary perkins, Moving to Portland, Portland Oregon, Restaurants, Things to do in Portland OR | Tagged , , , , , ,

New Light Rail Line – SW Corridor Plan

 

 

 

SW Corridor

The SW Corridor refers to the large area extending from SW Portland down I-5 to Sherwood, an area which is growing quickly yet lacks public transportation options to keep up with the increasing traffic.

The upcoming SW Corridor plan includes the addition of a new Max line that would extend from the South Waterfront all the way down to Bridgeport Village, added bike lanes, bus lanes, sidewalks, and park & ride lots to help clear up the I-5 traffic.

According to Tri-Met, voters in Tigard will have the power to make this reality in the November ballot.

I'm really hopeful this next phase of Portland's light rail project will come to fruition.  Traffic to and from Tigard and all around 217 is just a bear! 

Take a look at this article to learn more about the project:

http://www.oregonmetro.gov/news/looking-ahead-10-questions-about-southwest-corridor


Posted on June 26, 2016 at 5:22 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Current Portland Real Estate Market Information, Portland Oregon, traffic | Tagged , , , ,

In case you haven’t noticed, Portland is changing fast!

Fascinating article in Portland Monthly about the changes coming to Portland – enjoy! 

Portland is Changing Faster Than You Can Believe

Here are five big game changers already in the works.

 

 

 

Image: Amy Martin

 

 

 

1) Our River Is About to Get the Most Extreme Makeover Ever.

By the end of 2016, after decades of discussion, plans will take shape for a massive, federally mandated cleanup of the Willamette River. Portland’s waterway is currently awash with industrial PCBs, heavy metals, dioxin, and other contaminants. It’s likely the cleanup (shorthand: Superfund) will take decades, with cost estimates running as high as $2.5 billion. (Figuring out which of about 150 companies and government entities historically responsible for the pollution still exist, and who will pay what to fund the cleanup, is a major challenge.) The mandatory monitoring will continue for … oh, 100 years. At stake in a process that will run beyond 2116? “The river is a major economic engine,” says Michael Jordan (not that one), director of the city’s Bureau of Environmental Services. “To meet our population and employment projections, thousands of jobs need to be produced around the river. Add in risks to the environment and human health, and this is significant.” 

2) Portland Is About to Rewrite Its Own Blueprint.

As the Portland City Council readies to vote on a new “Comprehensive Plan” to guide development of the entire city, relish the differences, in specifics and zeitgeist, between the new plan and its predecessor, adopted 36 years ago.

 

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  • Pages Then: 34
  • Pages Now: (draft) 270

Vision Statement

  • Then: “Portland is more than a geographic area—it is a way of life.”
  • Now: Portland is a prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient city where everyone has access to opportunity and is engaged in shaping decisions that affect their lives.” (Subtext: Portlandia: it’s really a sequel.)

Projected Growth

  • Then: Population: 368,148  Projected – 20-year growth: 45,000 (Actual 20-year growth: 54,000—or 160,973 counting annexations)
  • Now: Population: About 610,000  Projected 20-year growth: 260,000 (Subtext: Squeeze in. The elevator’s going up!)

The Glossary

  • Then: What glossary?
  • Now: 152 words or phrases defined, from “mode split” to “Portlander” (Sample: “Continue—Persist in an activity or process.”)

Neighborhood Involvement

  • Then: 162 words. Sample: “Encourage citizen involvement in land use planning projects by actively coordinating the planning process with relevant community organizations.”
  • Now: 2,554 words Sample: “Maintain partnerships and coordinate land use engagement with: individual community members; communities of color, low income populations, Limited English Proficient (LEP) communities, Native American communities, and other under-served and under-represented communities … ” (It keeps going. And going.)

Geeky Lingo

  • Then: “Nodes and Noodles”
  • Now: “Centers and Corridors” (Our old plans were funnier.)

3) Affordable Housing’s secret? Trust.

Searing-hot home and rental markets can look pretty doomy to housing advocates, not to mention low-income Portlanders looking for places to, y’know, live. But some strategies have already proven themselves.

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Image: kropic1 and Michael Rosskothen

 

 

 

The nonprofit Proud Ground, for example, has used a property structure called a community land trust to make about 260 metro-area homes “permanently affordable.” Typically, the organization—in partnership with governments, other nonprofits, or both—buys an existing home as it comes on the market. After any necessary repairs, the home is sold to a low-income buyer, with as little as $500 down and a fixed mortgage. (Median monthly payment: $1,037.) The trust structure allows the buyer to build equity—$60,000 over 10 years on average, the organization estimates. But Proud Ground also shares the equity, an arrangement which allows the home to be sold at below market rates when the original owner is ready to move on.

“The housing stock is out there,” says Diane Linn, Proud Ground’s executive director. “We’re going to advocate at every level of government and use every tool we can to add properties to our portfolio.” The aspirational goal: 400 homes by 2020.

4) The Edge Will Be the Center.

In Portland’s development boom, former fringe zones will become hotbeds of action.

Lents

THE WAY IT WAS The Southeast neighborhood oft derided as “Felony Flats,” long a go-to example of revitalization dreams deferred

CHANGE AGENTS In 2014, the Portland Development Commission jump-started lumbering renewal with a capital-letter-optimized “Five-Year Action Plan.”

THE VISION “I think we’re cementing this as a vibrant neighborhood,” says outgoing PDC director Patrick Quinton. “Now we need to think about how to execute our plans while maintaining the character of the community.

BIG MOVES Coming to SE 91st and Foster: the 34,200-square-foot Asian Health and Service Center, with design by Holst Architecture; a trio of mixed residential and commercial buildings involving veteran developers Williams/Dame and Palindrome and respected architecture firms Hacker and Ankrom-Moison.

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Downtown’s Southern Edge

THE WAY IT WAS A sleepy village around Portland State, girdled by a highway, enlivened only by a Cheerful Tortoise (the 64-year-old, just-off-campus sports bar)

CHANGE AGENTS PSU is renovating and building like mad, and MAX, streetcar, and bus lines have made this the city’s busiest transit hub.

THE VISION “Ten years from now,” says Portland State spokesman Scott Gallagher, “it will be hard to distinguish between the core of downtown and the south end.”

BIG MOVES The $60 million renovation of PSU’s business school will turn a bunker-like building into an airy sustainability showcase by 2017. That same fall, the retrofitted Viking Pavilion will reopen as a 5,500-max-capacity arts and sports venue. Buildable lots at PSU’s eastern edge—like SW Fourth and Harrison—will sprout mixed-use density.

The Broadway Corridor

THE WAY IT WAS The Northwest Portland seam between the Pearl District and Old Town, rendered comatose by the hulking, 14-plus-acre US Postal Service headquarters complex

CHANGE AGENTS After years of trying, PDC is finalizing an $88 million deal for the Postal Service site.

THE VISION A dense neighborhood that knits the Pearl to the Rose Quarter. “You can reweave sites that have been islands in the city,” Quinton says.

BIG MOVES  While design details are very much TBD, the agency envisions the USPS land as high-rise developments, extended North Park Blocks, and a huge batch of new housing, designed to complement Union Station and kick-start vacant lots on either side of Broadway. 

5) One  Temple’s Doom Signals a Battle Over History.

Late last year, the circa-1892 Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple—an imposing brick hulk in the Richardsonian Romanesque style at SW Third and Taylor—became the latest in a string of historic local icons (including Centennial Mills, the Portland Building, and Veterans Memorial Coliseum) threatened with demolition. The tipoff came when the temple’s new owner, development firm T&T, had the building removed from the city’s Historic Resource Inventory—a list of buildings that, in theory, can’t be demolished until after a stipulated 120-day waiting period.

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Image: Delicate and Targn Pleiades

 

 

After an appeal by the preservationist group Restore Oregon, developers agreed to wait out the 120 days before dismantling the building to clear the way for a hotel and offices. According to T&T’s Jeff Arthur, salvation just won’t pencil out. “It’s one of the tallest unreinforced masonry buildings in the city. ‘Seismic’ wasn’t a word when they built this,” Arthur says. “We’re still continuing to evaluate, but we’re definitely leaning at this point toward taking it down.”

For preservationists, Workmen Temple’s demolition may be a call to action. Jillian Detweiler, a spokeswoman for Mayor Charlie Hales, says the city intends to close the loophole that allows owners to remove buildings from the Historic Resource Inventory. And Restore Oregon’s Peggy Moretti argues the state needs “more carrots and more sticks” to make historic preservation feasible. “In every other state, local jurisdictions have a say in designating what’s historic,” she says. “And other states would have more financial incentives at their disposal.” But moves to constrain developers could be a tough sell: legislation backed by Restore Oregon, which would have provided incentives to renovate historic commercial buildings, failed last year. Meanwhile, it’s likely that by this summer, the onetime fraternal clubhouse will literally become history.

 

 

This article appeared in the April 2016 issue of Portland Monthly.
 
Thanks, Portland Monthly!

 

 

 

 

http://www.pdxmonthly.com/articles/2016/3/25/portland-is-changing-faster-than-you-can-believe


Posted on March 25, 2016 at 8:25 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Portland Oregon, Portland Oregon Real Estate, Portland Real Estate Data | Tagged ,

Spotlight on 97229 zip code

 

 

Statistics for the 97229 Zip Code through February 15, 2016

 

  • Properties for sale: 108
  • New Listings:  110
  • Sold Properties: 89
  • Pending:  97
  • Months of Inventory based on closed sales:112
  • Months of Inventory based on pending sales:  1.1
  • Absorption Rate (Closed Sales) %:  82.4
  • Absorption Rate (Pending Sales) %: 89.8
  • Average Active Listing Price:  $818,000
  • Average Sold Price:  $479,000
  • Average Price/Square Foot (Sold Listings): $211
  • Sold Price/List Price Diffential:  100%
  • Sold Price / Original List Price Diffential:  98%
  • Days on Market:  39
  • Medial Sale Price $475,000

New homes for sale are down 29% current -vs- same quarter 1 year ago and up 11.2% in the last month

Sold homes are up 36% current -vs- same quarter 1 year ago and down 25.7% in the last month

Pending sales are down .7% current -vs- same quarter 1 year ago, and up 4.8% in the last month

 

It's a great time to sell in 97229!

 

Cary Perkins,
Windermere Top Producer
Fun With Real Estate
Current Portland Oregon Real Estate Information,
Highlights of Portland Oregon, House Ideas
Portland Oregon Homes

by Cary Perkins

Portland Real Estate, Portland Oregon Top Producer, Windermere Top Producer, Portland Realtor, Portland Homes for Sale

 

Windermere Top Producer Cary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Posted on March 14, 2016 at 11:14 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Current Portland Real Estate Market Information, Moving, Portland Oregon Real Estate, Portland Oregon Realtors, Portland Real Estate Data, Portland Real Estate Statistics | Tagged , , , , , ,

World’s First Vegan Supermarket Chain to Open in Portland

 

 

Good News for Healthy Food Lovers!

 

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Vegan products are usually relegated to a tiny section in conventional grocery stores, but Portland, Oregon will soon be home to an entire vegan supermarket.

Veganz, the first and world’s largest vegan grocery store chain, will set up shop in the famously crunchy city later this year. Along with a supermarket, Veganz also plans to open a shoe and clothing store and restaurant in Portland.

The chain was founded in February 2011 in Berlin, Germany by former Mercedes-Benz manager Jan Bredack after he found bountiful vegan options during his travels around the U.S. and Russia, German news site The Local reported.

Bredack, who became a vegan in 2009, said he found it hard to “shop normally” at home. Germany, after all, is the meat-loving home to 1,500 different types of sausages and cold cuts.

Bredack said he wants to make vegan shopping easier for everyone and noted that his stores appeal to omnivores as well, estimating that 80 percent of his customers are neither vegan nor vegetarian.

“It should be really simple,” he told The Local. “People shouldn’t have to cut out anything.”

Veganz imports goods from 30 countries worldwide and sells thousands of vegan products, including plant milk and cream, fake meats and fish, vegan ice creams, vegan cheeses and sweets, as well as toiletries and cosmetics. You can see the incredible range of products they have at its Berlin branch here.

Currently, there are more than 10 branches across Europe, including Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Essen, Cologne, Prague and Vienna. Veganz’s first branch in the UK will reportedly offer more than 6,000 vegan products.

In the video below Bredack, talks about his plans to take Veganz food products on-the-go with a food truck for festivals, music and sports events.

Although the U.S. is still heavily a nation of meat eaters—vegans make up roughly 6 percent of the U.S. population—Americans have certainly reduced their meat consumption in recent years.

Besides a growing list of health concerns, more and more people are also considering the environmental consequences of meat and animal products. That’s because a Western-style diet rich in meat and dairy produce will lead to an 80 percent increase in greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, according to Tim Redford of the Climate News Network.

A 2014 research paper from UK think tank Chatham House, Livestock—Climate Change’s Forgotten Sector, explained why it may be necessary for a lot more people to go vegetarian or at least dial down their consumption of meat and dairy products.

Greenhouse gas emissions from livestock, the study said, account for about 14.5 percent of the global total, more than direct emissions from the transportation sector and more than all the emissions produced by the U.S., the world’s biggest economy.

Article courtesy of :  Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch


Posted on March 2, 2016 at 8:27 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in cary perkins, kitchen ideas, OR, Portland Oregon, Portland Oregon Restaurants, Restaurants, Things to do in Portland OR | Tagged , ,

Providore Fine Foods – Now Open!

 

Another fabulous food adventure for Portlandia! 

 

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Located at 2340 NE Sandy, Providore Fine Foods opened early February, and in addition to letting you shop for groceries with a glass of wine or beer in-hand, it offers many onsite dining options. Here's what to eat at the new Providore Fine Foods:

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 Flying Fish Oyster Bar

12 to 7:30 p.m. daily

www.flyingfishcompany.com

For years, the sustainably minded Flying Fish Company has operated out of its mobile fish truck and Hawthorne fish shack, and at Providore Fine Foods, it sells local seafood and operates an 8-seat oyster bar, with standing room at a bar along the window, too. Made of Oregon cherry wood, the bar is tucked in the rear of the store and will offer:

  • three types of oysters served raw daily. Netarts bay oysters, delivered to Flying Fish the same day they are harvested by Nevor Shellfish, start at $2.
  • hot Flying Fish Company smoked salmon served on a cedar plank
  • two daily soups (one seafood, one meat)
  • bone broth
  • one red, one white, and one sparkling wine
  • bottled and canned microbrews and one cider

Image credit: Dina Avila/EPDX

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Arrosto

11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily (tentative)

 www.providorefinefoods.com

After discovering Italy's rotisserie chicken with their noses on a trip on the Italian Riviera, Providore Fine Foods and Pastaworks co-owners Kevin de Garmo and Kaie Wellman knew they needed to open a Mediterranean-style rotisserie chicken shack. Arrosto, scheduled to open at Providore Fine Foods by the end of the week, sells its chickens and sides through a window onto the street.

 You can either take your order home or dig in in the Providore's seating area. Located at the front of the marketplace, the seating area seats around 20, either at two large communal tables or at a bar along the window. Come summer, the garage doors will roll up and the tables will spill out onto the patio.

  • Whole, half, and quarter rotisserie chickens. De Garmo says he prefers not to use a brine. "A brine is nice for breast meat, but it can make the rest of the bird soggy." Arrosto salt its chickens; stuffs them with rosemary; and brushes them with rosemary olive oil while cooking.
  • Every chicken comes with "crispy fat" roasted potatoes and a salad of wild baby arugula, escarole, and radicchio tossed with pecorino, croutons, and dressing.

Image credit: Dina Avila/EPDX

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Little T Baker

9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily

 www.littletbaker.com

With two additional bakery locations in Portland, the local Little T Baker will focus on the following:

  • baguettes, salt slabs, and other breads
  • croissants, danishes, and other pastries—breakfast or otherwise
  • Chocolate chip cookies featuring Woodblock Chocolate and other cookies

Image credit: Dina Avila/EPDX

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Pastaworks

9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily

 www.pastaworks.com
 

Pastaworks has always sold ready-to-eat items, but it's bringing lots of new ideas, including decadent chocolate and hazelnut Baci cookies and a line of foccaccias that now come with optional toppings, like prosciutto. It also hired executive chef Derek McCarthy (Firehouse, Pig & Pie), sous chef Jeff Ciuffetelli (Taylor Railworks, Clyde Common), and baker Abby Ward(Serrato, Tin Shed). 

Image credit: Dina Avila/EPDX

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Rubinette Produce Market

9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily

www.rubinetteproduce.com

"We'll be the first to deliver local strawberries each year," says owner Josh Alsberg, who hopes to offer both farmers market-level produce and regular hours. To do it, he's enlisted farmers who are willing to grow special produce just for him. The fresh produce options are extensive, but here are some highlights:

  • lesser-known varieties of fruits and vegetables, from avocados to grapefruits
  • vegetables you simply aren't likely to find elsewhere, like burdock root, celeriac, and kale sprouts

 

 

 

Cary Perkins,
Windermere Top Producer
Fun With Real Estate
Current Portland Oregon Real Estate Information,
Highlights of Portland Oregon, House Ideas
Portland Oregon Homes

by Cary Perkins

Portland Real Estate, Portland Oregon Top Producer, Windermere Top Producer, Portland Realtor, Portland Homes for Sale

 

Windermere Top Producer Cary Perkin

 

 


Posted on March 2, 2016 at 7:49 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in cary perkins, kitchen ideas, Portland Oregon, Portland Oregon Restaurants, Restaurants, Things to do in Portland OR | Tagged , , , ,

Design Trends to Watch for 2016

What are the hot trends to look out for in 2016 in home design?

Here are a few predictions from the remodeling and design site Houzz on some of the big trends to expect. 

Article courtsey of: Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR® Magazine

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Contemporary Kitchen by Brooklyn Architects & Building Designers Maletz Design 

1. Two shades of kitchen cabinets.

The upper cabinets may be a white or neutral but then more designers are trying out deeper colors or wood tones for the lower cabinets.

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Mediterranean Dining Room by Dallas Interior Designers & Decorators CDA Interior Design

2. Formal dining rooms are back.

More home owners are opting to keep the dining room and not turn it into an office. The formal dining room is expected to get more attention this year.

 

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Mediterranean Kitchen by Geneva Kitchen & Bath Designers Past Basket Design

3. Multi-purpose kitchen islands.

The “workhorse” kitchen island is about more than just adding workspace in the kitchen, but also for adding more storage, prep sinks, and a way to add extra seating.

 

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Beach Style Powder Room by Austin Photographers Kailey J. Flynn Photography

4. Mirrors that make a statement.

Medicine cabinets are heading out and now wood-framed, modern, or vintage mirrors are adding more style to bathrooms.

 

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Rustic Kitchen

5. “Barely there” kitchens.

Kitchens are fading into the backdrop as the open layouts infuse more seamlessly into the living room or other spaces in the home. Aiding that trend, more kitchens are featuring open shelves to add to that openness.

 

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Transitional Sunroom by Chicago Interior Designers & Decorators Tom Stringer Design Partners

6. Sunrooms are hot.

Houzz identified this as one of the top dream spaces for home owners. Some home owners are finding ways to even transform tucked away corners in their home into a sunroom with a few chairs to relax near windows.

 

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Traditional Kitchen by San Francisco Architects & Building Designers Sutro Architects

7. White kitchens dominate.

White kitchen walls and cabinets and even countertops is a trend with staying power, Houzz predicts. To add some splash to the all-white kitchen, designers are adding touches of color through the tile floors or floor-to-ceiling bookcases.

 

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Transitional Powder Room by New York Interior Designers & Decorators Chango & Co.

8. Powder rooms get more bold.

Wall coverings are getting punched up in powder room, that include everything from custom graphics to textured walls. Also, designers are mixing in ornate chandeliers or furniture-like pieces to add some more pizzazz to these spaces.

 

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Farmhouse Entry by Roxbury Architects & Building Designers Haver & Skolnich LLC Architects

9. Farmhouse style guides the entryway.

Farmhouse style is catching on, particularly for the mudroom. Simplicity in the storage solutions and durable materials are taking charge.

 


Posted on February 29, 2016 at 11:08 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Beautiful Houses, cary perkins, Color in home decor, Current Portland Real Estate Market Information, Decorating Ideas, house idea of the day, House Ideas, kitchen ideas |

New face on an old friend, Besaw’s

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After a brief time spent looking for a new home, Besaw's really landed on their feet, and only a couple of blocks away from their old home on NW 23rd.  What a gorgeous space!  Stunning wallpaper, mini-tile pillars, and tons of natural light – welcome to the new Slabtown's best new restaurant.

Once they finally opened, I knew the buzz would make it next to impossible to get in for breakfast.  Thanks to opentable.com I was able to score a nice reservation for our breakfast networking group last Friday. 

We tried the liege-style waffles with basil cream and glazed apples, (you get to choose your garnishes from a fun selection) the farmer's hash with brussel sprouts, potatoes, cheddar and escarole, plus a fabulous scratch biscuit, and the rey-rey's chile relleno burrito, with tasty house-made mole.  The coffee kept coming, and we only wished we weren't working, because the full-service bar looked tempting with its innovative cocktails for day drinking!

Everything was delicious, the coffee refilling was non-stop, and the atmosphere was sparkly!  The service is still working out kinks but hoopefully it'll calm down once the newness wears off.  Give this place a try!  Now that reservations are an option, there's no reason not to! 

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1545 NW 21st Avenue, Portland 97209

 RESERVATIONS via opentable.com or contact@besaws.com 228-2619 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cary Perkins,
Windermere Top Producer
Fun With Real Estate
Current Portland Oregon Real Estate Information,
Highlights of Portland Oregon, House Ideas
Portland Oregon Homes

by Cary Perkins

Portland Real Estate, Portland Oregon Top Producer, Windermere Top Producer, Portland Realtor, Portland Homes for Sale

 

Windermere Top Producer Cary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Posted on February 7, 2016 at 7:25 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in cary perkins, Portland Oregon, Portland Oregon Restaurants | Tagged , , , ,

Thank you for recommending me

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Nothing influences people more than a recommendation by a trusted friend. 

I'm so grateful that you continue to give my name to your friends and colleagues!

Thank you!


Posted on January 20, 2016 at 8:57 pm
Cary Perkins | Posted in Current Portland Real Estate Market Information |